O-11A Fire Truck

With the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, America invested in Civil Defense including fire protection. The US Air Force was no exception.

Warbird Overview

With the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, America invested in Civil Defense including fire protection. The US Air Force was no exception. The American LaFrance Foamlite Co. was awarded several large contracts to build a new generation of advanced crash fire rescue (CFR) trucks for the United States Air Force. The first O-10 vehicle was handed over to the USAF in 1951. Over the next eight years, American LaFrance and Marmon-Herrington built more than 1,100 of these boxy all-terrain O-10, O-11A, and O-11B crash trucks, which could be airlifted anywhere in the world.

 

ABOUT THE F-14 TOMCAT

With the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, America invested in Civil Defense including fire protection. The US Air Force was no exception. The American LaFrance Foamlite Co. was awarded several large contracts to build a new generation of advanced crash fire rescue (CFR) trucks for the United States Air Force. The first O-10 vehicle was handed over to the USAF in 1951. Over the next eight years, American LaFrance and Marmon-Herrington built more than 1,100 of these boxy all-terrain O-10, O-11A, and O-11B crash trucks, which could be airlifted anywhere in the world.

Following the O-10, was the O-11A. It came with dual foam nozzles on the forward cab roof and four cab doors. The wheelbase had grown to 190 inches, and overall length had been extended from 26 feet, 5 inches, to 30 feet, 4 inches. Part of the size increase involved higher capacity for the fire-fighting agents: 900 gallons of water, 100 gallons of foam, and 40 gallons of bromochlormethane. The drive train had also been changed, and a Continental S 6820-8 engine with 820 cubic inches and 310 horsepower had been installed, along with a Spicer 6854 or 6855 five-speed transmission and a two-speed Timken T-138 transfer case. Tires were bigger (14.00×20 instead of 12.00×20). The auxiliary engine for the Hale discharge pump was a Continental air-cooled eight-cylinder model PE-200-2.

These trucks remained in service into the early 1970s.

  • Fact #1

    Has two engines – one for the truck and one for the water pump.

  • Fact #2

    These fire trucks were used at the former Carswell Air Force Base and can be seen in action in the movie “Strategic Air Command” which was filmed here in Fort Worth.

  • Fact #3

    Served Air Force from 1950 through the 1970s and air liftable to anywhere.

Manufacturer: American La France,
Overall Length: 30’4″
Overall Width: 8’2″
Overall Height: 11’4″
Gross Weight: 42,500 lbs.
Truck Engine: Continental Motors Model S6820-71 310 Brake Horsepower @2800 rpm
Pump Engine: Continental air-cooled eight-cylinder model PE-200-2
CAPACITY
Water: 900 gallons
Foam: 100 gallons
CB Tank: 40 gallons
Crew: 3-5
Unit Cost: $57,895

This truck was restored and donated to the Fort Worth Aviation Museum by Bob Adams and the B-36 Peacemaker Association.

Good shape and will need a good wash and brush down.

Note: Scheduling is always a moving target depending on weather and workload. All schedules are subject to changes.

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